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and how sweden's top company plans to grow in the united states. britain's's pan european disclosed discussing a union to create a 93 billion dollar titan that would be the world's largest aerospace and defense company. deal if approved by global regulators would join europe's leading military and aerospace contractors into a new giant that builds commercial cargo fighter trainer aircraft helicopters and rockets and saturdayel lights missiles and radars and other sophisticated electronics communication systems and security products. the companys proprosed the -- proposed complex ownership ada holding 68% and bae40%. to alie security concerns executives have promised to operate bae's vast operation independently of the new parent. what does the deal mean globally what's next and what will government regulators be focusing on. join us is stev. grundman who analyzes and reviewed defense mergers and acquisition at the pentagon during the clinton administration and he advices defense and aerospace companies worldwide and has absolutely no stake in this particular transaction. >> no. righ
it because he loved the work. he really thought the mission of the united states to help these fragile countries move ahead, start anew, that's what he really loved about libya. from the time that he was working to restore ties with the libyan government to being an envoy to the opposition and helping the rebels on the ground in bengzi, to now becoming the u.s. ambassador to libya, he really was someone that felt it was really important to kind of -- the democratic values and need to build proper institutions and try and have a peaceful stable country. >> we understand that he was really regarded in some ways as a hero to the rebels and the people in benghazi in particular. how did he feel? how comfortable did he feel moving around in libya? >> he felt very comfortable. that's what a lot of people are talking about today that maybe he felt a little too comfortable. chris was someone that felt very at ease in benghazi. he knew the area well. he knew the country well. so he might have not -- he might have felt a little bit more immune than some other people would to his safety because he
continuing interest in military matters. now, in 1917 the united states goes to war. fdr goes to see what your willson and tells him he wants to resign his post and he wants to be in uniform. wilson said know you're doing an important job where you are. when the united states is deeply involved in world war i, she's determined to get to the western front and against the resistance of his boss, the navy secretary daniels manages and their key to that office in a vaguely military uniform of his own devising. he wears pants tucked into he was a french army helmet and a gas mask. in september of 1939 ranks summer and then came portugal and bulgaria. he's the commander-in-chief of the army that trans with trucks marked tank and whose soldiers trained with hand grenades substituted by eggs. by the time the war has been underway for a number of months, clinton is pretty much with its back to the wall to countries and the netherlands and as most france, denmark, norway have been conquered by the germans and the invasion of britain seems imminent he's determined to try to do something to help the
to be realistic about how we can tackle these challenges. if there is a crisis that i see in the united states for the long term, it is not the temporal issue of how we will deal with money. because i am very confident we will be able to deal with that. it is how will we bring that -- bring back our sense of what we can accomplish together as americans when we are realistic about those challenges. that is the thing i think about the word "crisis" in this country. >> mayor castro is not the first to suggest that. for 10 years now, we heard that the government is not asking all of us to do enough. >> it is interesting. the word "sacrifice," when i hear a politician say that, it usually means grab your wallet. it usually means increasing taxes. and i will give president obama credit to in his the first presidential candidate since walter mondale to run explicitly on a platform that he will raise taxes. >> he is saying he will raise taxes on the wealthy. >> according to the supreme court, he already has raised taxes. that was the basis on which the supreme court of held obamacare, that it was a ta
an address by his excellency, felipe calderon, president of the united mexican states. . [no audio] [no audio] >> on behalf of the general assembly, i have the honor to welcome to the united nations, his excellency felipe calderon hinojosa, president of the united mexican state to address the assembly. [applause] >> send your president take -- -- mr. president and head of state and ladies and gentlemen -- out of conviction and as a result of history, mexico is a strategic ally of the united nations. we were one of the founding countries of the united nations and as a founding country, we fully share its fundamental precepts, the precepts of our great organization. for me, this will be the last time i will be attending as the president of mexico. it will be the last time i attended the general assembly of the united nations. over the past six years, my country has taken part in very different fora to pave the way for you and initiatives. we have endeavored to strengthen the u n and make it the main body for dialogue and peace and for security and for the application of international law and, i
, in a sense, talking about, like, the 99%. think of, you know, some of the demonstrators m united states or in europe who have also said that the system is rigged against them. there might be some resonance. >> the american delegation, they walk out. clearly, that was not unexpected, but you did have some real power players who are sitting there. he does have a world audience, a wobbled stage. you've got russia wra. you have iran. china. the u.k. many of these other very powerful players here. how do they respond to them him? >> you know, if you look at russia and china, they believe that each country should be loued to do what it wants, and if they want to talk, let them talk. although russia does support the let's say movement to try to limit iran's ability to develop a nuclear bomb, and that would put them on the side of the united states. when it comes to kind of let them talk, they would sit there and listen to it. the united states decided not to even walk out. they didn't even walk in. they issued a statement. maybe we can read that statement if we have it. yes. coming from the sp
judiciary led the way to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and oral brennan to the supreme court, but the host of liberal republicans such as the president appointed himself like albert title of georgia and john of louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment i think that eisenhower made at that time is that of john marshall hall of the great conservative justice and just after the landmark decision in brown v board of education. shortly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died leaving the vacancy on the court, and at that point roosevelt turned to the grandson of the great marshall harlem who would be the only dissenter in percy versus ferguson and 1896, the case legalized segregation by appointing the great dissenter eisenhower was making a statement he could not have adored. he said eisenhower was going to enforce it. when the segregation attempted to swap the integration in little rock eisenhower sent
. the united states drew a clear, red line. iran backed off. different lines can be drawn in the i iranian nuclear program. but to be credible, a line must be drawn first and foremost in one vital part of their program -- on their efforts to enrich uranium. let me explain why. any bomb consists of an explosive material and a mechanism to ignite it. the simplest example is fuse.der in and a you light the fuse and set off the gunpowder. the gunpowder is enriched uranium in regards to iran's nuclear program. the fuse is a detonator. for iran, amassing enough uranium is far more difficult than producing a nuclear fuse. for a country like iran, it takes many, many years to enrich uranium for a bomb. that requires thousands of center fuses spinning in tandem in big industrial plants. those are green plants are visible. they are still vulnerable. in contrast, iran could produce a record detonator, the fuse, in a lot less time. maybe under a year. maybe only a few months. the detonator can be made in a small workshop the size of the classroom. it might be difficult to find and target that workshop
drones. it is coming from two respected universities in the united states. i think if this message is coming from independent academics and the united states, maybe it will be listened to. the report conclude the strikes are damaging and counterproductive. they estimate the overall number of top leaders killed among the drone victims is perhaps only 2%. they say while they are not killing the top tier or not be enough of the commanders, they are terrorizing an entire community. that is the word that they use, stressing that the drones hovering overhead night and day. they say communities are paralyzed by fear and many people are too frightened to go to import and gatherings. parent are keeping their children out of schools or the children themselves are too traumatized to go. the level of fear has been compared to the level of fear in the u.s. after 9/11. >> the report also says the vast majority of those victims are combatants or low-level combatants. americas argument is if it did not use drones, it would have to use much more interest of tactics to go after these combatants. >>
his speech. netanyahu has been critical of the united states, saying there is no more time for diplomacy on iran's nuclear program. plus, mira sore vino stops about her crusade to stop human trafficking and tomorrow you will meet a teacher who struggled a teacher that strug d for years and then found a way to profit off of what she was doing in the classroom and it turned her in to a millionaire. it's an amazing story. it is "out front" tomorrow. here's piers morgan tonight. >>> tonight, nuclear threat in the east, mahmoud ahmadinejad says he is the victim. >> no one feels secure or safe, even those who have stockpiled thousands of atomic bombs and other arms in their arsenals. >> we hear what will it take to keep iran from getting the bomb. >> i don't see victims. i see hard-working ohioans. >> we can't afford four more years like the last four years. we have to get the economy going again. >> campaigns go head to head. what the latest means. nate silver will be asked if romney can win and deepak chopra, wesley clark and ameerah al-taweel. things get lively at the clinton
on american aircraft over the united states. i don't think that's going -- nothing's going to stop that happening. >> reporter: the u.s. government is not even considering allowing passengers to use cell phones on planes. but officials are looking into whether passengers can use devices like these to read or listen to music during takeoff and landing. american airlines pilots just started using ipads in the cockpit throughout the flight to access maps and other information. flight attendants will also get tablets to use inside the cabin. and consumer advocates say allowing passengers to do the same during takeoff and landing would only be fair. >> it kind of bothers consumers and passengers not so much the fact that they can't make cell phone calls, just the fact they can't use any electronic devices. >> reporter: and he worries one day on domestic u.s. flights dealing with a loud neighbor talking on a mobile phone may be the next in-flight inconvenience. sandra endo, cnn, washington. >> polls show mitt romney's support is lagging in key states. we'll talk with newt gingrich about
of the united states. >> find any speech from both the democratic and republican conventions online at the c-span video library. >> during the republican and democratic conventions, we're asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president, as part of this year's c-span student cam video documentary competition. in a short video, students will answer the question, what's the most important issue the president should consider in 2013? for a chance to win the grand prize of $5,000, and there's $50,000 in total prizes available. c-span's student cam video competition is open to students grade 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to student cam.org. >> i want c-span, c-span2 and the books portion of c-span, because i feel it's important to be knowledgeable about what's going on in the world, and i feel that c-span gives the most information about what's going on in specific subjects, where a lot of television doesn't do that. >> hillary pate watches c-span on comcast. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your
with protecting the united states in particular. the obama administration changed our plans for european missile defense to leverage the existing missile defense system and put that system sure first in romania and poland later on. they also curtailed the ground-based midcourse. they stopped it at 30. i think the wrong administration would actually probably go back and change the balance again, much more in favor of national missile defense systems and we have actually seen in congress, republicans have been pushing the idea of deploying some of these ground-based and interceptors on the united states disclosed. another area of specific differences in shipbuilding. it is an imperfect measure, but the total number of ships in the navy -- it actually reached a low point at 279 ships, i should say. that was in the bush administration in 2007. we have come up since then i think we were about 280 ships right now. the obama administration plans to bring the shift count up to about 300. the goal is still 313. but if you look over 830 year shipbuilding plan, and averages over 30 years. so if we graduall
. it was in the united states and we are talking about a place where it is not safe to send an f.b.i. agent. why the f.b.i.? because they do the best forensics. they are best at figuring this stuff out. it is our intelligence and others that put more fact on top of that letting us get to the bottom of this. this is benghazi. you do not just go wandering in with 15 or 20 f.b.i. agent. >>neil: something collapsed but we will find out. you are right, joe. very go to see you. >> i think i know why this guy had to draw pictures for the united nations. a lot them are pretty stupid at the united nations. they can tax your patience especially when they tax your wallet. are you ready ? share everything by turning your smartphone into a mobile hotspot for up to 8 wifi-enabled devices at no extra charge. like the new droid razr m by motorola only $99.99. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b med
saying ice free in as early as 202. we have a responsibility. in the united states we are about the only educated country or oecd country that will argue that this isn't primarily a human problem. somehow, we have to take this take this political system and move it the right way. it's time for the united states, in this area, to lead. we didn't lead. we should have led. after kyoto, it is time right now, urgently for the united states to team with china and lead us forward, out of where we are in carbon and in to a new, responsibility as global citizens. >> united states doesn't have to go through a battle to lead the world. you are already leading. you have other leaders who are emerging out there, which is fine. this is a globalized world. so just embrace them. keep inspiring and keep doing what you are doing. believe in young people. believe in technology and science and have leaders like them lead the way. >> it's a marathon. it's a marathon, not a sprint. i'm 37. i've done all the things you can possibly do in music, and i never thought i would be able to do those things when i was
to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and william brennan to supreme court. it was a host of liberal republicans that roosevelt appointed himself. men like elbert tuttle of georgia and john wants in a louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment, i think, that eisenhower made at the time, was that of john marshall harlan, great conservative justice, just after the court's landmark decision in brown versus board of education. certainly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died, leaving a vacancy on the court. at that point, roosevelt turned to harlem, who is the grandson of the great john marshall harlan, who had been the only dissenter in 1896, a place that utilized segregation, by pointing harlem, the main gate of the great dissenter, eisenhower was making a statement of the south could not ignore. desegregation was the law of the land and eisenhower was going to enforce it. when a mob attempted to block it,
things that is not a premarket industry in the united states because regardless of whether we have the information as to the optimus and effectiveness of a hospital or a physician problem -- or a physician, our health care provider networks that we are allowed to use are dictated by the insurance companies. a lot of the discussion about health care in the united states, people fail to discuss the role of the insurance companies and in network and out of network providers. i would like for you to comment on a world of our employers and large insurance companies play in directing where we get care. oftentimes, we are not allowed to get hair -- get care at, say, a university hospital or a teaching hospital regardless of our condition since solely because the out of pocket expenses will be way too high for a person to report getting the best care, even though it exists. guest: in my book and "and accountable," i share the reasons why it patient often decides to come to, particular hospital. their mother was treated there, the party was easy. if people are choosing a hospital based on t
's a crude film. they know it has nothing to do with the united states government. it is an excuse. one intelligence person told me, if you scratch the surface, and if you gave every street vendor from street vendor to prime minister in that region a chance to throw a rock at the u.s. embassy, they would. so this is their excuse. >> look at what's happening in afghanistan 11 years later. >> and look what's happening in afghanistan. and is it just me? willie, is it just me, or is it -- we have the grave concern about the tragedy that happened to the ambassador and our people that have served so proudly for, you know, for the state department who were killed. and yet this weekend, more u.s. troops in afghanistan gunned down by our supposed allies. this happens every day. this happens every day. and yes, our u.s. ambassador being killed is just absolutely horrific. but every single day, young american men and women are gunned down in afghanistan. >> 51 of them this year on insider attacks. 51 nato troops including many americans this year. >> nobody's talking about it. >> to your point exa
first. so of not red or blue states, what the united states. i no they're not that many football fans here today. my first story about president obama has to do with football. he was the last interview that i did for my book. i interviewed three andrew and 50 people will for him and traveled the world. i thought about what i would -- how i would break the ice with him for a long time. i remembered that he is a bears fan than i am a pakistan and that two years ago when the packers played the bears in the nfc championship game president obama announced that if the bears won he was going to the super bowl. the packers won. and the star player on the packers after the game got up on the table of the jesse berman said, president obama will come see us, but we're right to go see him at his house meeting if you win the super bowl you to visit the white house. this was their star quarterback, so when i finally got my interview with president obama and shook his hand and said, mr. president, charles got here before me, but i'm glad we both finally made it. he said, yeah, man, those packers wer
or iran or turkey invoking the greatness of their own power and impact and the united states tends to be more future oriented but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and in the iranian revolution is still very formative and the - of americans who are responsible for the iran policy. >> guest: it is. ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that they are the most historical were the least historical society. and in this case i think there's still certainly every time they have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow during the whole litany of grievances, so it is always on their mind. whether the u.s. policy makers realize it or not, the are too. the first years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was for most american policy makers mind. if the iran contra happens that causes the relationship with the next prior risk and we saw it happen to ronald reagan and over a series of instances where they have spurred u.s. efforts to the rapprochement. there's a great example like to give just on this idea of the mo
produce all sorts of nuclear missiles getting ahead of the united states in defense in a way that was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. one of the reasons he won election in 1960. he got into office with access to intelligence and realized soviets are way behind, extremely behind the united states. there is a missile gap in favor of the united states so the problem was kennedy and campaign said we need to increase defense in order to make of this problem and he was committed to that. in 1961 the largest defense buildup in human history and the results to a great extent, one of the ways he dealt with that, and a large portion of humanity to death. >> when did crucial of -- >> guest: he was high on solid leadership but when we went to dinner at stalin's, never knew when the car came back whether it would take us home or to the gulag and it did take some people to the gulag but not crucial of. stalin died in 1953. there were two leaders who were essentially joint leadership. khrushchev and malenkov. by 54-55-56, crucial of was the supreme l
transformation of women writers or literary seekers from the rest of the world. as you know, united states of america, the land i love, the land i have adopted as my home, in recent decades has paid less and less attention to transiti transition, especially to literary translation. the number of books from the middle east and north africa into english -- [inaudible] in the last 32 years, there has been a lot more translation of english literature that there has been in america, from the land that many consider -- >> is there a contemporary woman rider and iran that you would recommend? olutely. let's first say that -- [inaudible] there is a renaissance. there is a renaissance going on in iran. and women are at center stage. let me give you one example about women novelists. in 1947, we have the first major collection of short stories by our foremost woman novelist can and she passed with a couple weeks ago at the age of 19. so women writers are very exceptional. women poets in iran go back over 1000 years, because poetry is more woman kind of art form. you can ride in the privacy of your h
as assistant secretary of the navy and went on to become vice president and president of the united states. in 1916, roosevelt the secretary of the navy. he has been appointed to the record as the associate justice by president william howard taft. but he resigned in 1916 to become the republican candidate for president and he ran against woodrow wilson and a dreadful campaign he was the odds favor, but ultimately lost california by 4000 votes and therefore the election. he went to bed the night of the election thinking he had one. franklin roosevelt was said that wilson supporter went to bed thinking he's had one also. and the next morning the returns from the midwest and particularly california came in and it turned out that wilson one the election just rarely. roosevelt continued as assistant secretary of the navy and then he has to act to private practice in new york city. roosevelt in 1920 became the vice residential candidate of the democratic party, running with governor james cox of ohio. they got trapped by calvin coolidge and warren harding, coolidge's republican party. and at th
, and he is the president of the united states. wilson, he is sick. but he sends his secretary of state to the convention to emcee the convention. >> host: he wanted the nomination. >> guest: he wanted the nomination, and harding, coolidge, hoover, fdr is on the ticket as a vice presidential candidate, and so you have this hook and so much else going on with the league of nations and everything other thing. and 1960, we move on to where you have three titanic personalities. we don't have six but we have three of the biggest name brands in presidential personalities ever. kennedy, nixon, johnson, and so very, very different. so very, very different amibitions in terms of personal, and something which i think resonates so much with folks who are reading books today. 1948, a great cliffhanger, and we love to listen to the experts and get the weather reports, and they're always wrong, and the polls are always wrong, and the experts are always wrong, and by god we love it when we're smarter than they are, and it turns out we can look back in hindsight and see how wrong they were in 1948. and
>> there is no the community in the united states of america the votes overwhelmingly 90% for one party. in 1996 i realized we voted republican. we only -- were the only race in the united states of america that is done. it's created a system that decided the republican party where republicans say we've got to win without them. so somebody starts with whether they are racist or not racist, people say stupid things in both parties. i used to get into that debate. i don't anymore. i'm just about trying to build people up, not tear people down. so that was a stupid discussion. do i think that is reflective of the whole party? now i don't. i don't publicly that. my point, i'm not trying to defend him. i don't come to these discussions trying to defend republicans nor do i come trying to defend democrats. i comes and here's what i believe and here's what i support. getting back to the point, if were able to look at some kind of model where we to 20% of the african-american committee and we said okay, you be a democrat, get engaged, go work on the hill, be a big fundraiser, to the polic
of the island and here in the united states, the east coast is not out of play either. so let's get right to alexandra steel. she is at cnn hurricane headquarters. what can you tell us? >> it's not as bad as it could be for bermuda. bermuda sees hurricanes about three every ten years and it's moving farther east than we'd seen it before. this is the atlantic. we do have two hurricanes at play. there's leslie. here is michael. this is a category 2, it is small, tight, powerful. 105-mile-an-hour winds. good news, won't affect anyone, won't affect land. so with that, our attention turns to leslie. now, right now it's category 1, maximum sustained winds at 75 miles an hour. what's happened is it has sat over the same space, kind of the cold water for the last 18 hours or so. so we have not seen any intensification. so that is the good news. here is the projected path. now, you can see here is bermuda right now, it's about 430 miles south/southeast of bermuda, expected to make the past farther east than earlier thought sunday morning. so here are the impacts. this area east of haley fax cou ha
of companies being started. there actually in the united states has been a dip in new starts. usually there's an upswing in new starts in the recession. we have a very unusual recession going on here. i think it's largely driven by the origins of the recession, that it was a finance-based recession. this has rippled through in terms of credit into the economy and it's changing the nature of available capital resources for startups. although your concern is logical, i don't think it's what's happening right now. >> the number one concern people have about the u.k. is the proximity to europe. this seems to be the number one issue. you can't do anything about the back drop. the government has pinned its hopes on programs like the funding for lending scheme. do you think this does anything to encourage small businesses? >> there's a couple of points in there. i completely agree that we have a challenge that our largest trading partner is the e.u. there's little to be done about that per se. but funding -- the lending for business scheme is a challenge in the startup context in a number of level
. thank you. >>> the bodies of the four am in the united states. u.s. marines saluted the coffins at andrews air base. those killed were ambassador chris ste vaccines, first ambassador killed in the line of duty in 33 years. navy s.e.a.l.s tyrone woods and glenn dougherty and sean smith. third coffins arrived on friday. at the memorial service both secretary of state hillary clinton and president obama spoke about putting an end to the violence. >> it is senseless, and it is totally unacceptable. the people of egypt, libya, yemen and tunisia did not trade the tyranny of a dictator for a tyranny of a mob. >> we will bring to justice those who took them from us. we will stand fast against the violence on our diplomatic missions. we will continue to do everything in our power to protect americans serving overseas -- >> u.s. embassies around the world issued alerts advising americans to review their security measures. for more we turn to margaret brennan. what are american embassies doing at this point? >> they are pretty much on lock down. you have a real focus on securing the perime
, or is this something much deeper, a long simmering distrust of the united states? >> it's all the above. it's much long-simmering resentment of the united states. it has some legitimate reasons, but it's essentially a pretext, and it is not really about religion. it's about politics and world power. it's about what's taking place in these countries that are going through a tremendous complex, painful transition. take egypt, for instance, extremists and islamists with different interpretations of islam competing with the mainstream islamist group in egypt which is the muslim brotherhood. >> right. >> they whipped up frenzy against the movie initially, and then the president, who is very cynical, was looking to protect his flanks so he called for more demonstrations instead of containing the demonstrations or condemning them so what you have is a competition in egypt as to who is going to shape the future of egypt, and using this movie as a pretext. >> which raised the question. is this about the united states really at all, or is this about uncertainty in these people's own futures and their religious l
to bring showers down across the baja peninsula. and looking dry across the western half of the united states. and there is plenty of rain around. but, fire weather created by those dry conditions, as well as strong wind, we have got a red flag warnings for parts of montana, western north dakota, as well as -- wyoming. and then we run into -- quite day lot of rain across the east. some severe thunderstorms, forecast through the great lakes. down in toward kansas. potential for flash flooding. as heavier rain makes its way up through toward the northeast. all right. let's take a look at your temperatures then. some, some real heat is building in across the south. oklahoma city. 40 degrees for you. we do have warnings posted from kansas down through toward, louisiana. and the coast. up toward, winnipeg. 22 degrees. some cooler air coming in. behind, that front. up to the north. is going to be bringing temperatures down. 15 degrees in winnipeg wednesday. seeing things looking comfortable in chicago as well. getting done to 25 degrees. all right, a large system is dominating northern europ
american forces, became two-term president of the united states and the for some reason the los angeles press corps was paralyzed in place. so i stepped forward and i began asking questions of what i called, general eisenhower. i didn't call him the president because, to me had always been a general. we had really good exchange. and in which he said he wanted reagan to run as a favorite son in six at this it. -- '68. you thought that with be good for the party around good for the country. that was in his own way a shot at rich richard nixon. >> guest: boom, you write, one minute ike and man in gray flannel suit in the lonely crowd and next minute, tune on, tune in, drop out, time for we shall overcome and burn baby burn. while americans were walking on the moon, americans were dying in vietnam. there were assassinations and riots. jackie kennedy became jackie o. ty e-die shirts rpt martin luther king, jr. george wallace, tom hayden and. mick jagger and wayne newton. well you get the idea, boom. >> guest: i don't want to overstate this seldom in our recent history at least has there been
the very stylish, 34-year-old first lady of the united states surrounded by all these dashing people and then that came to an end. and the war began to heat up and suddenly the country seemed, seemed to come unhinged in a way. all the values of the world war ii generation come home with challenged within their own families. institutions of government, place of government in our lives. the idea of loyaltity and patriotism all went out the window. civil rights movement went from nonviolent movement led by dr. king depending on rule of law, it went to the streets. you know, violence in america is as as american as cherry pie. so it was a, it was a head-snapping time. there was no question about it and the fact that we emerged from it and reasonably good shape is still fairly astonishing to me. it is a real tribute to the tense aisle strength of this country in a lot of ways. >> host: i began my marriage, tom brokaw writes and my career as journalist in 1962, a straight arrow product of the 1960s. by the time decade was over i had my first taste of the marijuana, i had long hair and week
speech he would say the united states was the only country on earth where we put our hands over our hearts when we sing our national anthem, which was quickly disproved by just looking on youtube. people around the world going like this and singing their national anthem. he dropped at the very next day. he never said it again. >> he paid the price. >> maybe. >> i would say that is an example of actually changing behavior, which i think happens rarely and in small increments. >> i think the other thing we were talking about before the panel with brendan, the other thing we do not know, how many conversations are going on with campaign message people, with people making ads, with speechwriters, they are talking about wording. how often are they saying, if we say that, the fact checkers will get us? i suspect that is happening a lot. the only evidence i have of that is a column written by connie schultz, who is married to sherrod brown, who says that happens in the brown campaign. i suspect that is happening in many campaigns. there is so much fact checking going on, not just with our
conservative governor in the united states. florida, i understand it's a swinstate in presidential election, but it's a swing state when you have,ou know guys running like mitt romney and john mccain and bob dole. a tough conservative wins florida. >> what was the impact of that ad -- i couldn't believe when he picked ryan, the democrats ran an ad of some guy whoooke yaus granny off the edge of a cliff in a wheelchair. it was subtle. >> it was subtle but that doesn't work because marco rubio got elected by promising. the one big date that he had with charlie cristndhe deatppt, talked about raising social security to 70. bob graham, one of the most popular democratic politicians in florida history, always talked about the need of possly raising the retirement age for social security and medicare. therhe are a lot smarter than politicians think. so no, it wasn't that good. let's talk some more about ike because, again, i think the guy is slowly evolving into my favorite president. talk abo- you say he's a war hero whoated war. and i guess ike, after korea, u.s. serviceman wasn't killed? >> ye
, it's still actually quite sticky in the united states. badly there needs to be a dose of fiscal consolidation. we would say it's going to be 1.5% of gdp. in the eurozone it's -- if the uk it's 1.25. >> good to see you today. thanks for joining us. >>> german chancellor angela merkel is preparing for yet another meeting today -- >> how is she doing? >> it's one after another after another. she is set to hold talks with herman von rompuy. she's been having down time and having a few beers at a german beer festival. >> this is how she does it. >> the german chancellor did get on stage and called on germany to have solidarity. >> is she on the stage? there she is. i wonder if she would have a sash and flowers. she looks quite happy. >> she just wants the beer. >> is that post the beer? she looks like she's enjoying herself. >> love it. >> where do we go on the road to the beer festival? >> oktoberfest. >>> still to come, president obama is set to make his pitch for four more years in the white house as the democratic convention kicks off. could the real focus be on friday's jobs rep
as well as in the united states. >> markets saying these figures point to eurozone contraction of 0.5% in qe. what's your outlook? >> it's in line with our numbers. we think for the full year the eurozone contracts at 0.4% rate, so not far off what you suggested and that seems to be consistent with the underlying data coming in. no real revisions just yet but we'll watch and wait. >> what about 2013, is that a year -- 2012 we see europe broadly contracting. what about 2013? >> a lot hinges on the global environment. hinges on whether the u.s. can slowly grow and maybe grow a bit faster. whether china can begin to pick up steam. external stories can be critical for europe. >> larry will stay with us. let's check in and check out market reaction. >> one hour into european trading session. 73 declining outpacers. ftse 100 down 1.5% yesterday. down 0.5%. dragged yesterday by u.s. disappointing. the xet ra dax down 0.3%. ibex down after a good rise in july. keep your eye on bond rates. yesterday we had a nice rally in spain on two-year. ten-year, 6.62%. that's slightly higher on the sess
framework in the united states. we look at the fed. one of the greatest threats to the u.s. and the capitalism really is academics and bureaucrats that really run our entire regulatory framework in the u.s. and they run the federal reserve. we need risk it takers. people that have actually taken risk to be in the regulatory framework. if you look at the crash of 2008, who is making all the decisions? it was hank paulson, someone from wall street. and we have a situation all these years later where if you look at the fdic, the futures trading commission, the regulatory infrastructure doesn't have approach risk takers. and that's a big threat. >> it sounds like you think the fed are taking risks. >> i've been behind the scenes taking to hedge fund managers. these are complete experimental drugs, they don't have an exit strategy. they want to make us feel good with academic contrived jargon, but this is a massive experiment. and what i'm worried about, think about in the united states we have a trillion dollars in pensions. they're underfundeded compared to '08. that's a pro
allowed to continue to happen, there would be conflicts around the world. do you suggest that the united states should curtail free speech? >> well, i would like to say in this way of where there is free speech, there is a human right. and i started the declaration of human rights but there is limit in exercising human right for all people, all nations. >> are you going to ask president obama to change his policy in any way on free speech? >> i don't think -- i'm not in a position to lecture any leader on this matter because one thing that i believe all leaders can take many lessons from what is happening worldwide, including the last incidents about the -- i incidents of anti-islam films. >> you have investors watching. indonesia, the 16th largest economy in the world. gdp of $850 billion. it's really been one of the bright spots in the emerging markets in this global slowdown and a new mckenzie report is predicting the economy getting to the seventh largest by 2030. what can you tell us in terms of your expectation for economic growth next year and in the coming years? >> well, i am pl
up. >> make it sounds like the president of the united states is bystander. he is the president. >> sean, this question came to me. he did not --. bill: sean, give sean the final seconds of this delayed satellite. sean, 10 seconds. go. >> the bottom line is the president didn't lead. americans aren't better off. you can't keep making excuses why things didn't get done. need to replace this president with mitt romney and paul ryan who have a plan to move america forward bottom line. >> maybe next time he does a convention speech he have can tell us what that plan is. bill: next time we put you in the. >> mitt romney.com. 59 points to get the economy moving forward. bill: here's martha. martha: well, all right, we have 63 days to go, folks, until the election and it is all about that narrow slice of folks who have still not made up their mind out there. a brand new poll shows mitt romney with a slight lead in a state that president obama won last time around. which one is it? we'll show you when we come back. more "america's newsroom" live music: "make someone happy" music: "make
of volume in the afternoon because there will be no incentive from the united states. euro/sterling, down a little bit. after that manufacturing pmi number came much better than expected. so interestingly enough, employment stilg still picking up in manufacturing. although it's still in contractionary territory. if you like pmi, you'll like china for the last couple of days. >> i think, ross, asian bourses mostly finished higher despite down beat manufacturing numbers from china. analysts say those weak readings could prompt supported policies from the central bank. the gape, 0.6% gold liner search off future fed. developers rally following the comments on building more affordable housing. the hang seng followed suit, helped by congress congress property place and internet giants. turning negative in late trade to end at a four-week low. lost over 6% after it proposed to revise down its stake back in march. energy places and industrials sent the kospi higher by .4%. samsung electronics lost a round after apple targeted four more cents on products. the afx 200 eked out modest gains, higher
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